Philosophy & Ethics

WHY STUDY PHILOSOPHY AND APPLIED ETHICS?

Philosophy and Applied Ethics is a GCSE course which offers an exciting and relevant opportunity for students to consider response to fundamental questions of life. Students will develop their knowledge of beliefs, values and traditions of Christianity and explore how Christians respond to pertinent moral and philosophical issues raised by human and religious experience.

WHAT DOES THE COURSE INVOLVE?

Topics covered include:

Life and Death: origins of the universe and human life, stewardship and value of human life. The soul. Afterlife, Euthanasia, abortion

Relationships: attitudes about families, sexual relationships, same sex marriage, marriage. Equality. Nature of God, creation, Jesus Christ, Salvation, afterlife Life of the Buddha, Dharma, Four noble truths, human personality, Human destiny and ethical teaching

Crime and Punishment: Death Penalty, Aims of punishment, Corporal punishment

Peace and Conflict: Violence, Weapons of mass destruction

Types of Worship: Baptism and Eucharist, Pilgrimage, the church in the local community and worldwide Buddhist place of worship, Meditation, devotional practices, death and mourning, festivals and retreats

HOW WILL I BE ASSESSED?

Students will look at Philosophy and Ethics from the Christian and Buddhist perspective. Over the two years students will follow the AQA course in Religious studies. At the end of Year 11 there will be two exams each lasting 1 hour 45 minutes.

During lesson time students will be involved in a range of activities including discussion, debate, presentations, research and evaluation. The student will need a high level of literacy to cope with the demands of the course.

WHAT USE IS IT?

The course takes issues which are in the news every day and investigates the issues involved by looking at a variety of belief systems including Christianity, Buddhism, Secular and personal viewpoints.

The course will develop:

  • In-depth thinking, useful for careers such as law, teaching, medicine, psychiatry and any others which require in-depth and creative thought, especially when there are no straight forward answers.
  • Breadth of understanding of important issues from a variety of viewpoints, useful for any employment that involves working with other people: journalism, social work, police nursing, management, the civil service and similar careers

For further details of this course see Mr Wright, Leader of Religious Studies.

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